iProcrastinate Podcast
Why we procrastinate and what we can do about it.
 

What we might consider procrastination varies around the world. Take the word mañana for example - that notion that a task belongs to some indefinite time in the future. Do we all think about delay and procrastination the same way? Obviously not!

In this conversation with  a colleague from Peru, Professor Karem Diaz, we get a different perspective on the nature of our delay. We discuss some differences between collectivist and individualistic cultures, the influence of economic development, social class and indivdual differences. I know you'll find it interesting.

To learn more about procrastination, visit procrastination.ca or look for The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

I close the podcast with a song entitled "Procrastination" by Matt Weidinger. Let me know what you think at tpychyl@procrastination.ca.

Direct download: Procrastination_in_Peru.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:25 PM

Is procrastination the same everywhere? A recent email from a listener (check out her blog at incurable-hippie) provided an example of two cultures (the Britsh and the French) where it seems to differ. I discuss this issue in relation to published research as well as the work of one of my doctoral students, Mohsen Haghbin (Carleton University), who joins me to present his perspective. It's a wide-ranging discussion of what words mean in relation to psychological constructs across cultures and time.

If you want to learn more, visit procrastination.ca or check out The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Procrastination_across_cultures.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:16 PM

Illusions abound about procrastination. This week, I consider 10 of the most common illusions, explaining why we might think these things, but what research reveals as the "truth" of the matter. This episode of the podcast is a version of a talk that I gave recently to students and faculty at Fanshawe College, London, Ontario. I close the podcast with a song entitled "Procrastination" by Matt Weidinger. I think I've found a new theme song for this podcast! Let me know what you think at tpychyl@procrastination.ca.

To learn more, visit procrastination.ca or pick up a copy (paper or ebook) of: The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Unnecessary_illusions.m4a
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:46 PM

Existential themes of autonomy, authenticity, agency, freedom, choice and the will are at the center of the discussion in this podcast. In response to listeners' requests, I explain this existential perspective on procrastination with reference to very interesting further reading.

To learn more, visit procrastination.ca or The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle

Direct download: Autonomy_agency__procrastination.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:18 PM

A recent study underscores the importance of executive function in self-regulation and procrastination. In this interview with Dr. Laura Rabin (Department of Psychology, Brooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn), we get to hear from an outstanding young neuropsychologist who also has a clinical practice. As you'll hear, Dr. Rabin's research focus is not normally on procrastination, but she brought her neuropsychological expertise to bear on how we might better understand self-regulation failure through the neurocognitive processes known as executive function (the ability to organize, plan and and problem solve). I know you'll enjoy the interview and learn a great deal of practical things related to improving our own executive function.

You can learn more about this study in my blog on Psychology Today with this post: A Neuropsychological Perspective on Procrastination

To learn more about procrastination, see procrastination.ca or The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Executive_function.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:17 PM

My title for the podcast today is taken from a recent study published in the International Journal of e-Collaboration by Dr. Anabel Quan-Haase of the University of Western Ontario (London, Ontario, Canada). Her focus is on how students use instant messaging for their social networking and how, as she writes, "instant messaging is disruptive and multitasking can lead to losses in productivity." Anabel's research revealed that students use a number of different techniques to self-regulate their use of these technologies including preventive and recuperative approaches such as ignoring incoming messages, denying access and digital/physical removal. This is an interesting and far-ranging conversation about some of the promise and peril of instant messaging.

To learn more about procrastination and self-regulation see procrastination.ca or The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Instant_Messaging.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:09 PM

Here's an interview with psychologist and author, Dr. Guy Winch (guywinch.com). Guy explains how we can learn new strategies to more effectively complain constructively, much like we might learn to provide constuctive criticism to foster more positive outcomes. The power of this perspective is in dealing with important issues more effectively whether these be complaints to a retailer, bureaucrat, coworker or partner. When we learn to deal with our complaints more constructively we are less likely to avoid or put-off seeking resolution which reduces the destructive processes of rumination and resentment. We complain more effectively to those who can do something about the issue, and we stop burdening our friends and family with our resentment and unproductive complaints.

I think you'll enjoy the interview, as we can learn a great deal from Guy about his work as a psychotherapist and his focus on "complaining the right way."

To learn more about procrastination, see procrastination.ca or The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: The_Squeaky_Wheel.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:39 PM

This week, I'm sharing an interview I did on Philosophy Talk. As explained on philosophytalk.org, Philosophy Talk is a weekly, one-hour radio series produced by Ben Manilla. The hosts' down-to-earth and no-nonsense approach brings the richness of philosophic thought to everyday subjects. Topics are lofty (Truth, Beauty, Justice), arresting (Terrorism, Intelligent Design, Suicide), and engaging (Baseball, Love, Happiness). This is not a lecture or a college course, it's philosophy in action! Philosophy Talk is a fun opportunity to explore issues of importance to your audience in a thoughtful, friendly fashion, where thinking is encouraged.

Of course, the topic this week is procrastination. I had a lot of fun discussing a variety of issues with the hosts John Perry and Ken Taylor of Stanford University. I know you'll enjoy their show, and I encourage you to check out others in this weekly broadcast.

To learn more about procrastination, see procrastination.ca or read The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Philosophy_Talk_on_Procrastination.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:57 PM

Agency, freedom, responsibility, choice, bad faith, death, life and love - all of this and more in today's podcast as I reply to a listener's thoughts about the existential aspects of procrastination. In this podcast, I refer to an article in the New Yorker. You can access the full article here (thanks Chris!).

If you want to learn more, see procrastination.ca or The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Choice__Procrastination.m4a
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:34 PM

This week, I chat with a listener from England, Jessica Shailes. Based on an earlier podcast about the "unschedule," Jessica developed an Excel spreadsheet to help her plan more effectively. The podcast includes an introductory section reviewing the concept of the unschedule with direct reference to Neil Fiore's book, The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play. You can find Neil's books on Amazon here.

You may download the sample spreadsheet that Jessica discusses in the podcast, or a blank template based on this work for your own use. Thanks Jessica!

Jessica has a new blog that you may find interesting. It's called Resolutions (not just for New Years!). Some great Vegan recipes here.

You can always learn more at procrastination.ca (check out the Psychology Today blog Don't Delay), or by reading The Procrastinator's Digest: A Concise Guide to Solving the Procrastination Puzzle.

Direct download: Unschedule.m4a
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:07 PM